Church of England and Ireland in the colonies
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Church of England and Ireland in the colonies return (in part) to an address of the House of Lords dated 15th February 1867 for copy of a despatch of Her Majesty"s Secretary of State for the Colonies to the officer administering the government of Natal on the subject of the colonial chaplaincy in that colony, dated 12th August 1866; also, copy of a despatch of Her Majesty"s Secretary of State for the Colonies to the Lord Bishop of Montreal relating to the appointment of a Coadjutor Bishop of Niagara, dated 21st November 1866; and also, copies of any returns which have been made in answer to the questions lately issued by Her Majesty"s Secretary of State in reference to the condition and circumstances of the United Church of England and Ireland in the colonies. by

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Published by HMSO in [London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Church of England -- Great Britain -- Colonies.,
  • Church of England -- Great Britain -- Colonies -- Government.,
  • Church of England -- Great Britain -- Colonies -- Bishops.,
  • Church of England -- Grande-Bretagne -- Colonies.,
  • Church of England -- Grande-Bretagne -- Colonies -- Gouvernement.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesReturn (in part) to an address of the House of Lords dated 15th February 1867 for copy of a despatch of Her Majesty"s Secretary of State for the Colonies to the officer administering the government of Natal on the subject of the colonial chaplaincy in that colony, dated 12th August 1866; also, copy of a despatch of Her Majesty"s Secretary of State for the Colonies to the Lord Bishop of Montreal relating to the appointment of a Coadjutor Bishop of Niagara, dated 21st November 1866; and also, copies of any returns which have been made in answer to the questions lately issued by Her Majesty"s Secretary of State in reference to the condition and circumstances of the United Church of England and Ireland in the colonies
SeriesCIHM/ICMH Digital series = CIHM/ICMH collection numérisée -- no. 9_01949, Parliamentary papers / Great Britain. Parliament (1865-1868). House of Lords -- 86, 1867.
The Physical Object
FormatElectronic resource
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19434573M
ISBN 100659019493
OCLC/WorldCa163282262

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History of the Church of England in the colonies and foreign dependencies of the British Empire. London: F. & J. Rivington, (OCoLC) Material Type: Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: James S M Anderson. The History of the Church of England in the Colonies and Foreign Dependencies of the British Empire, Volume 3 The History of the Church of England in the Colonies and Foreign Dependencies of the British Empire, James Stuart Murray Anderson: Author: James Stuart Murray Anderson: Edition: 2: Publisher: Rivingtons, Original from: Harvard. True, the Church of England in the colonies suffered from a sluggish rate of growth and a shortage of clergymen throughout much of the seventeenth century. But in the century before the American Revolution, that communion’s fortunes prospered: Anglican churches spread along the length of the Atlantic seaboard, the largest concentration being in the coastal South. Meanwhile, many loyal members of the Church of England, who ridiculed and mocked Puritans both at home and in New England, flocked to Virginia for economic opportunity. The troubles in England escalated in the s when civil war broke out, pitting Royalist supporters of King Charles I and the Church of England against Parliamentarians, the.

  The Church of England, or Anglican Church, is the primary state church in Great Britain and is considered the original church of the Anglican Communion. Protestants discontented with the Church of England formed the earliest religious settlements in North America. Monsignor John Tracy Ellis wrote that a "universal anti-Catholic bias was brought to Jamestown in and vigorously cultivated in all the thirteen colonies from Massachusetts to Georgia.". During the British colonial era, the Anglican religion was exported to the colonies. From onwards, Church of England dioceses were founded in the colonies. A structure of provinces and metropolitans developed until, in , the imperial Privy Council ruled that the English church hierarchy had no legal status in the colonies. Protestants discontented with the Church of England formed the earliest religious settlements in North America. Soon, the colonies became a focal point for religious immigration as separatist Puritans and others established themselves in what were to become the 13 colonies. The non-separatist Anglicans became entrenched in Virginia.

Ireland, English Colonization. The histories of the islands and communities of the British Isles have always been closely intertwined. However, the arrival from England into Ireland of the Normans in marked the commencement of a new incursion and settlement that, although piecemeal, localized, and with a fluctuating frontier between Gaelic Irish and Norman areas, created the basis for a. The Elizabethan Religious Settlement of established the Church of England as a Protestant church and brought the English Reformation to a close. During the reign of Elizabeth I (r. ), the Church of England was widely considered a Reformed church, and Calvinists held the best bishoprics and heless, it preserved certain characteristics of medieval Catholicism, such. The Church of Ireland (Irish: Eaglais na hÉireann; Ulster-Scots: Kirk o Airlann) is a Christian church in Ireland and an autonomous province of the Anglican is organised on an all-Ireland basis and is the second largest Christian church on the island after the Roman Catholic other Anglican churches, it has retained elements of pre-Reformation practice, notably its. In , England signed a treaty with Southern Ireland to make it an "Irish Free State." Though this did not grant the country complete independence, it did release tension and gave some measure of governing power back to the Irish. Northern Ireland, which is home to many former British Protestants, remained "loyal" to the crown.