Dissipative structures and morphogenetic pattern in uhicellular algae.
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Dissipative structures and morphogenetic pattern in uhicellular algae.

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Published by Royal Society in London .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesPhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London -- Vol. 294, no. 1074, 16 September 1981, pp547-588
ContributionsRoyal Society.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13808236M

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Patterns of cell wall growth and ornamentation in unicellular algae, mainly in desmids, are compared with patterns generated by Tyson's Brusselator, a two-morphogen reaction-diffusion model. The model generates hexagonal arrays of points in two dimensions, according well with the observed patterns of surface ornamentation on desmid zygospores. Patterns of cell wall growth and ornamentation in unicellular algae, mainly in desmids, are compared with patterns generated by Tyson's Brusselator, a two-morphogen reaction-diffusion model. The Dasycladalian algae produce diverse whorled structures, among which the best-known are the reproductive whorl (cap) and the vegetative whorls (hair whorls) of Acetabularia acetabulum. The origin of these structures is addressed in terms of three pattern forming mechanisms proposed to explain whorl formation. The mechanisms involve either: mechanical buckling of the cell wall, reaction Cited by: 1. Reaction-diffusion systems have often been invoked as a mechanism for the generation of chemical gradients which initiate pattern formation in embryos. We describe how, with the aid of path-following methods and the pseudo-spectral method, the space of steady-state solutions of the equations can be systematically mapped by: 6.

The pattern of wall deposition in sucrose was compared in control cells and in cells also treated with A After 1/ hr in an isotonic solution, the cells were plasmolyzed in At sucrose to reveal more clearly the wall deposition by:   The number of cotyledons in angiosperm monocots and dicots is tightly constrained. But in the gymnosperm Pinaceae (pine family), which includes many of the conifers, cotyledon number (n c) can vary widely, commonly from 2 to Conifer cotyledons form in Cited by: 2. Unicellular algae occur most frequently in water, especially in lankton is the population of free‐floating microorganisms composed primarily of unicellular algae. In addition, algae may occur in moist soil or on the surface of moist rocks and wood. Algae live with fungi in lichens.. According to the Whittaker scheme, algae are classified in seven divisions, of which five are. Dissipative structures and morphogenetic pattern in unicellular algae, (). A class of reaction-di®usion mechanisms which preferentially select striped patterns, Reaction di®usion modelling of biological pattern formation: application to the embryogenesis of Drosophila melanogaster,Cited by:

Algae lack the distinct cells and organs that characterize land plants. Algae range in size from microscopic organisms, such as plankton that drift passively near the surfaces of oceans and freshwater bodies, to macroscopic seaweeds several meters long. The structural body of algae, either unicellular or multicellular, is called the thallus.   Mechanisms acting in pattern morphogenesis in the cell walls of two distant groups of plants, pollen of spermatophytes and diatoms, are compared in order to discriminate common principles from plant group- and wall material-specific by: Dissipative structures in nature and human systems E. B. P. Tiezzi1, R. M. Pulselli2, N. Marchettini2 & E. Tiezzi2 1Department of Mathematics and Informatics, University of Siena, Italy 2Department of Chemical and Biosystems Sciences, University of Siena, Italy Abstract Evolutionary physics studies the general behaviour of non equilibrium systems. Journals & Books; Help Download PDF Recent examples of biological pattern formation where a pattern changes qualitatively as the underlying domain grows have given rise to renewed interest in the reaction–diffusion (Turing) model for pattern formation. T.C. LacalliDissipative structures and morphogenetic pattern in unicellular algae Cited by: